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Snowmobiling Big Flat

I’d heard of Ramblers, knew it had some pretty beautiful mountains, but hadn’t considered checking it out until a friend asked if I wanted to go snowmobiling outside Beaver, Utah with Adam Eakle.

How could I resist?

Check out Adam Eakle’s video about snowmobiling in Beaver, Utah. 

We visited Ramblers in early February and hooked up with Rock’n J Rentals who instructed us to drive up Hwy 153 past Eagle Point Ski Resort and park at Puffer Lake where the county stops plowing the highway. The meeting spot was easy to find, and we were met by our guides who had driven the sleds up the canyon. At this point, I was a bit nervous. But mostly, I was really excited. 

After some instruction, we rode our sleds farther up the highway until we reached Big Flat, an open meadow where we were free to ride as wanted. This was ideal for someone new like me as my body learned to maneuver the sled and turn comfortably. I was surprised at how quickly I was able to feel relaxed on the snowmobile, and before I knew it, riding it became play rather than practice. 

I marveled at the breathtaking landscape—12 inches of powder on top of a two-foot base, a myriad of pine trees surrounding us, and a fog that quieted everything and blanketed us with a sense of mystery and magic. 

I followed the edge of the trees, unable to see through them because of the fog, and let my mind wander. I raced against my friend, who was as elated about the experience just as much as I was. At 11,000 feet, we didn’t see another person the whole time, making it feel as though we’d traveled through space and time. 

With temperatures in the 30s with little to no wind, our four hours of snowmobiling flew by quickly, and before I knew it, it was time to head back down the highway and back to our cars and trailers. 

I wish I had more time, but Ramblers isn’t far from my home, and I know I’ll return again soon. Next time, I’ll come during the summer because I’d love to see these mountains when they are green and the trails are dry and ready for a hike. I may not recognize Ramblers without the snow, but then, it will be like visiting someplace entirely new.